Design Dialogue: Longhouse & Peabody Fine on Passive House

Laura Ours, AIA, Kevin Walker, AIA, and Nathan Webb, AIA, with Longhouse Architects sat down virtually with David Peabody, FAIA, and Robin McGrew, AIA, of Peabody|Fine Architects to learn about their path in sustainable architecture. David was an early adopter of the Passive House (PH) methodology; he’s been a Certified Passive House Consultant since 2009. Robin is also a CPHC and resides in a Passive House that she designed and built in 2019.

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Cornerstones: Sidney Griffin, AIA, NOMA

Sidney Griffin, AIA, NOMA, chooses his words carefully, with a calm reassuring voice like the countdown to a shuttle launch — perfect for navigating frustrated colleagues through a difficult computer crash or corrupted BIM model.  On a sunny February afternoon, I met with Griffin to discuss his new role as the first BIM Project Manager for the University of Virginia’s Geospatial Engineering Services, the future of integrating technology and buildings to benefit building owners, and how serving our clients better and becoming a more inclusive profession could go hand in hand.

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Glavé’s Lori Garrett: Strengthening the firm’s culture is its future

In January, Richmond-based Glavé & Holmes Architecture, named Lori Garrett, FAIA, President of the firm, succeeding Randy Holmes, FAIA, who had occupied the post for 21 years. With this change, the firm became Virginia’s largest woman-led architecture firm. Garrett, who holds an M.Arch. from the School of Architecture at the University of Virginia, marks her 17th year at Glavé and will continue to lead projects she is managing for the firm’s higher education studio. In this wide-ranging interview, she talks about the firm’s growth strategy and its response to this post-covid labor market.

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Case Study: Transforming VCU’s Scott House

The Scott House, completed in 1911 and more than 18,000 square-feet, was designed by Richmond architecture firm Noland and Baskervill. One of the grandest residences of its day, it was built for Frederic William Scott and Elizabeth Strother Scott in a Beaux Arts style. The design references Newport’s Marble House, which in turn looks to the Petit Trianon at Versailles. The exterior is Tennessee limestone and terra cotta on the first and second floors, with a copper-clad, recessed third floor, as well as a copper-clad conservatory on the first floor. A rear service wing is made of buff brick. According to the National Register, its interior “can be understood as an architectural museum, with rooms in many different styles.”

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